Funbers 31, 32 and 33

Fun facts about numbers that you didn’t realise you’ve secretly always wanted to know…

31 – Thirty-one

Hands up if you like ice cream? And your favourite brand? I’m not sure I could pick a favourite myself, but Baskin-Robbins is certainly up there. They have a total of 31 flavours of ice cream which means the name of their shops in Japan literally translates as ’31 Ice Cream’. In theory a great idea, but what if they discover a magical new thirty-second flavour…

Aside from frozen goods, thirty-one is also the number of teams in the National Hockey League, with 24 coming from the US and 7 from their Northern neighbours Canada. Each season, the teams battle it out to win the Stanley Cup — the oldest trophy to be awarded in professional sport in North America, and also the one with the infamously large base (see below). Originally, key members of the winning team were engraved on the base, which means its grown a fair few inches over the past 126 years. However, these days the oldest band is removed and replaced with a new one to prevent the trophy from getting any bigger. Less fun no doubt, but perhaps sensible given its already considerable size…

Andy_Saucier_with_Stanley_Cup_2017-06-11_16188_(2)

Credit: Michael Miller

Thirty-one is also a Mersenne Prime — the third such one in fact. A Mersenne Prime is a prime number that can be expressed as exactly one less than a power of two: 2^n — 1 for some positive whole number n. To get 31, we take n=5: 2⁵ = 2 x 2 x 2 x 2 x 2 = 32 minus 1 gives 31. A perhaps surprisingly large (and possibly infinite) amount of prime numbers take this form, with the current largest known prime number also being a Mersenne Prime: 2⁸²⁵⁸⁹⁹³³–1 = a number with 24,862,048 digits, aka too many for me to write out here!

32 — Thirty-two

Sticking with maths, thirty-two has the very nice property that it can be written as 1 to the power 1 plus 2 to the power 2 plus three to the power three, or in its neatest form: 1¹ + 2² + 3³ = 32. Here’s a challenge for you: can you work out the next largest number that follows the same pattern?

32 can also be written as 2⁴ + 4² = 32 which makes it a Leyland Number. Any number that can be written using two other numbers x and y, in the pattern x to the power y plus y to the power x, is classified as a Leyland Number. Here, we take x = 2 and y = 4 to get: 2⁴ = 2 x 2 x 2 x 2 = 16, plus 4² = 4 x 4 = 16, giving a total of 16 + 16 = 32. Other Leyland Numbers include: 8, 17, 54, 57 and 100 — I’ll leave it to you to figure out the specific values of x and y needed to satisfy the formula x^y + y^x = Leyland Number for each of the cases above.

Outside of the mathematical world, thirty-two is the number of completed piano sonatas by Ludwig van Beethoven; the number of black (or white) squares, and total number of pieces on a chessboard; the number of teeth generally found in an adult human; and the number of described physical characteristics of the historical Buddha, according to the text of the Pāli Canon in the Theravada Buddhist tradition. It’s a pretty long list, but I think it is best enjoyed in its entirety, so here you go:

  1.  Level feet
  2.  Thousand-spoked wheel sign on feet
  3.  Long, slender fingers
  4.  Pliant hands and feet
  5.  Toes and fingers finely webbed
  6.  Full-sized heels
  7.  Arched insteps
  8.  Thighs like a royal stag
  9.  Hands reaching below the knees
  10.  Well-retracted male organ
  11.  Height and stretch of arms equal
  12.  Every hair-root dark coloured
  13.  Body hair graceful and curly
  14.  Golden-hued body
  15.  Ten-foot aura around him
  16.  Soft, smooth skin
  17.  Soles, palms, shoulders, and crown of head well-rounded
  18.  Area below armpits well-filled
  19.  Lion-shaped body
  20.  Body erect and upright
  21.  Full, round shoulders
  22.  Forty teeth
  23.  Teeth white, even, and close
  24.  Four canine teeth pure white
  25.  Jaw like a lion
  26.  Saliva that improves the taste of all food
  27.  Tongue long and broad
  28.  Voice deep and resonant
  29.  Eyes deep blue
  30.  Eyelashes like a royal bull
  31.  White ūrṇā curl that emits light between eyebrows
  32.  Fleshy protuberance on the crown of the head

33 — Thirty-three

Let’s start with the bad. Thirty-three is one of the symbols of the Ku Klux Klan, with K being the 11th letter of the alphabet and 3 x 11 or 3 K’s giving 33. It is also believed to be the age of Jesus when he was crucified by the Romans.

On a more positive note, 33 is the longest winning streak ever recorded in NBA history, which was achieved by the Los Angeles Lakers in the 1971–72 season. We also find 33 vertebrae in a normal human spine when the bones that form the coccyx (the tail-like part at the bottom) are counted individually.

Now I don’t say this often — mainly because I think I’m supposed to be impartial when writing these — but this next fun fact is one of my all-time favourites. Long playing records, or LPs as they are more commonly known, are referred to as 33’s in the record industry, because they rotate 33 and a third times per minute when playing on a gramophone. So, next time you see a record player you know what to do…

Common-vinyl-record-dimensions-for-vinyl-to-cd-transfer-1024x407

Funbers Christmas Special

A very fun Christmas treat for you all as I team up with my good friend Bobby Seagull for the Funbers Xmas Special – expect fun facts, lots of numbers, and more birds than anyone thought possible… Happy Holidays!!

Funbers 28, 29 and 30

Fun facts about numbers that you didn’t realise you’ve secretly always wanted to know…

28 — Twenty-eight

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Credit: Melchoir

29 — Twenty-nine

The_Making_of_Harry_Potter_29-05-2012_(7415385922)

Credit: SunOfErat

30 — Thirty

Square_pyramidal_number

Feb1712

Cover image credit: Lozikiki

Tom Rocks Maths S02 E10

Episode 10 of Tom Rocks Maths on Oxide Radio sees the conclusion of the million-dollar Millennium Problem series with the Hodge Conjecture, a mischievously difficult number puzzle, and the answer to the question on everyone’s lips: how many people have died watching the video of Justin Bieber’s Despacito? Plus, the usual great music from the Prodigy, the Hives and Weezer.

Image credit: Lou Stejskal

Funbers 25, 26 and 27

Fun facts about numbers that you didn’t realise you’ve secretly always wanted to know…

25 – TWENTY-FIVE

You probably know 25 as five squared, 5 x 5 = 25, but I bet you didn’t realise that it’s also the sum of the first five odd numbers: 1 + 3 + 5 + 7 + 9 = 25. It also crops up a lot in Pythagoras’ Theorem (yes, him again — see Funbers root 2) because it’s the smallest square that’s also the sum of another two square numbers: 25 = 3² + 4². Since Pythagoras’ Theorem says that a² + b² = c², we have the exact result with whole numbers (integers) for a = 3, b = 4 and c = 5. A solution such as this, where all of the numbers are integers, is called a Pythagorean Triple.

Looking beyond the maths, most videos are recorded at a frame rate of 25 per second as the PAL video standard – other options are available, but twenty-five does an excellent job of tricking the human brain into seeing a moving picture where in fact only a series of still images are being shown. Less than 25 and we might start to notice the ‘jumps’ between frames, and for more than 25 we’ll need a lot more data to record and store the footage.

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Twenty-five is also the average percentage of DNA overlap between yourself and your grandparent, grand-child, aunt, uncle, nephew, half-sibling, double cousin (when siblings from one family have children with siblings from another), or identical twin cousin (if one of your parents is an identical twin and their twin has a child). Oh, and apparently a ‘pony’ is British slang for £25 – news to me…

26 – TWENTY-SIX

With twenty-five being a square number, and (spoiler alert) twenty-seven being a cube number, twenty-six is uniquely placed as the only whole number that’s exactly one greater than a square (5² + 1) and one less than a cube (3³ – 1). Talk about niche. And then there’s the fantastically named rhombicuboctahedron — a shape with 26 faces, made up of squares and triangles. Can you spot how many of each in the figure below?

Rhombicuboctahedron.gif

Twenty-six also gives the number of complete miles in a marathon (26 miles and 385 yards to be exact), the number of letters in the Latin alphabet, and the age at which males can no longer be drafted in the United States. The draft has been used five times throughout history: the American Revolution, the American Civil War, World War 1, World War 2 and the Cold War (including Korea and Vietnam). Let’s hope it never has to be used again.

27 – TWENTY-SEVEN

Now this one’s a real doozy: 27% of our universe is made up of “dark matter” – matter that has mass but is also completely invisible and doesn’t interact with itself or regular matter. The rest of the universe consists of 5% regular matter (the stuff we know about), and the other 68% is completely unknown. Something, something, dark energy…

Sticking with scary thoughts, in Stephen King’s novel ‘It’ (great film by the way) the creature returns to the town of Derry every 27 years, which also happens to be exactly the right amount of time for a new-born baby to join the 27 Club — a term used to refer to popular musicians who have died at the age of 27. Current members include Jimi Hendrix, Kurt Cobain and Amy Winehouse amongst many, many more. We also have 27 books in the New Testament and 27 bones in the human hand.

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Ending with some maths — what else — twenty-seven is the only positive whole number that is exactly three times the sum of its digits: 2 + 7 = 9 and 9 x 3 = 27. It’s also a perfect cube, 33 = 3 x 3 x 3 = 27, and it’s equal to the sum of the digits from two to seven, 2 + 3 + 4 + 5 + 6 + 7 = 27. But, leaving the best until last, if you label the decimal places of the number pi, starting from 0, then the 27th and 28th digits read 27. It may seem like magic but it’s actually one of a few ‘self-locating strings’ in the number. The others being 6, 13598, 43611, 24643510, and no doubt many more yet to be discovered. That can be your homework…

π = 3.141592653589793238462643383279…

 

Image credit: Jonathan Kis-Lev

Funbers 22, 23 and 24

Fun facts about numbers that you didn’t realise you’ve secretly always wanted to know…

22 – TWENTY-TWO

Coming in hot, 22 happens to be one of my favourite numbers – if you divide it by 7 you get about 3.142, which is a handy way of getting close to pi without having to remember all the digits! Then of course there’s Joseph Heller’s famous novel Catch-22. In the book, Catch-22 is the Air Force policy which says that bomber pilots can only stop flying planes if they are declared insane. But like the name suggests, there’s a catch. Catch-22 says that asking for a mental evaluation to get declared insane is proof that you aren’t in fact insane. So technically, there’s a way to get out of flying more bombing runs… but if you try it, you get sent right back out in the next plane!

Catch22-plane

Twenty-two also pops up in the kitchen. Normally, if you are slicing a pizza using 6 cuts, you’d do it neatly and end up with 12 even slices – much like the numbers on a clock face. But if you were a lazy pizza chef and just sliced randomly, you could end up cutting slices in half and ending up with more pieces. And it turns out, the most pieces you can end up with after 6 cuts is, you guessed it, 22!

On a darker note, 22 was also the lucky number of the Haitian voodoo dictator Francois “Papa Doc” Duvalier. Papa Doc started studying voodoo folklore to spread rumours that he had supernatural powers, which let him rule through fear. But eventually, he started believing the rumours himself. He would only go outside his palace on the 22nd of the month, because he thought he was guarded by voodoo spirits on that lucky day. He even claimed to have killed JFK, whose assassination was on the 22nd of November 1963, supposedly by stabbing a voodoo doll of him 2222 times that morning…

1963haiti_duvalier

23 – TWENTY-THREE

For 23 we’re going back to maths, and specifically prime numbers. A prime number remember, is one that can only be divided by itself and one without giving any remainder. Twenty-three has the unique property of being the smallest prime number which is not a ‘twin prime’ – that is a prime number which does not have another one within two spaces of it on the number-line. For example, 3, 5 and 7 are all close friends, while 11 and 13 go together. 17 is next to 19, but the nearest prime number to 23 is either four places below at 19, or six places above at 29, making it the smallest prime number to not have the ‘twin’ property.

Twenty-three is also big for birthdays. Not because the age of 23 is particularly special (although being the age mentioned in my favourite song – Blink 182’s ‘what’s my age again?’ – I do have a soft spot for it), but because of its appearance in the ‘Birthday Paradox’. The complete explanation is a little too long for Funbers, but in short it says that if you choose 23 people at random and put them in a room together, there is a greater than 50% chance that 2 of them share the same birthday. If that sounds too crazy to believe, check out a full explanation here from one of my students who applied it to the 23-man England squad for the 2018 Football World Cup. Now to enjoy some classic pop punk: “Nobody likes you when you’re 23…”

24 – TWENTY-FOUR

Who remembers Avogadro’s constant for the number of atoms contained in one mole of a substance from high school Chemistry? No, me neither. But, a great way to approximate it is using 24 factorial – or 24! in mathematical notation. The factorial function (or exclamation mark) tells you to multiply all of the numbers less than 24 together. So, 24! is equal to 24 x 23 x 22 x 21 x 20 x 19 x … x 2 x 1, also known as an incredibly large number. It’s about 3% larger than Avogadro’s constant, but certainly easier than remembering 6.02214076 x 1023.

backgammon-789623_1920

Twenty-four also represents the number of carats in pure gold, the number of letters in the Greek alphabet (ancient and modern) and the number of points on a backgammon board. Mathematically, 24 is the smallest number with exactly 8 numbers that divide it – can you name them? And, it’s equal to exactly 4 factorial: 4! = 4 x 3 x 2 x 1 = 24. Last but not least, where would we be without the 24 hour day – or to be precise 24 hours plus or minus a few milliseconds to be completely exact…

Day length
Yesterday 24 hours -0.46 ms
Today 24 hours -0.39 ms
Tomorrow 24 hours -0.35 ms
Shortest 2019 24 hours -0.95 ms
Longest 2019 24 hours +1.67 ms
Last Year Average 24 hours +0.69 ms

 

Tom Rocks Maths: S02 E05

Tom Rocks Maths is back on Oxide Radio for Hilary Term 2019 with the usual eclectic mix of maths and music. Learn more about the only million-dollar Millennium Problem that’s been solved so far, fun facts about the number 6, and a nursery rhyme themed puzzle. Plus, music from Bring me the Horizon, Queen and Papa Roach. This is maths, but not as you know it…

Funbers 20

From the number of children of composer Johann Sebastian Bach, to the number of championships won by Manchester United, its fair to say that 20 gets around. Then there’s the 1920’s, seen as a time of boom and bust with the creation of jazz music followed by the great depression. Not to mention the Mayan counting system which uses base 20…

You can find all of the episodes in the Funbers series with BBC Radio Cambridgeshire and BBC Radio Oxford here.

Funbers 19

The 1900’s saw inventions that made a BIG change to our lives. Aeroplanes in 1903 changed the way we travel, TVs in 1925 changed home entertainment, and Microwaves in 1946 changed the way we eat. Nineteen also played an important role in the British Civil War and was the title of Adele’s first album…

You can listen to all of the Funbers episodes from BBC Radio Cambridgeshire and BBC Radio Oxford here.

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