Carnival of Mathematics

Next month (March 2019) I will be hosting the ‘Carnival of Mathematics’ – a monthly blogging round up hosted by a different blog each month and organised by the Aperiodical.

The Carnival of Mathematics accepts any mathematics-related blog posts, YouTube videos or other online content posted during the previous month (February 2019): explanations of serious mathematics, puzzles, writing about mathematics education, mathematical anecdotes, refutations of bad mathematics, applications, reviews, etc. Sufficiently mathematized portions of other disciplines are also acceptable. Links to the previous monthly posts and a FAQ section can be found on the Aperiodical website here.

The deadline to submit your posts will be the 1st March 2019.

Click here to submit an idea!

This incarnation will be the 167th Carnival of Mathematics so here are some fun facts about the number 167…

  • 167 is the only prime number that cannot be expressed as the sum of 7 or fewer cube numbers.
  • 167 is the number of tennis titles won by Martina Navratilova – an all-time record for men or women.
  • 167P/CINEOS is a periodic comet in our solar system.
  • M167 Vulcan is a towed short-range air defence gun.
  • 167 is the London bus route from Ilford to Loughton.

The previous Carnival can be found at Math with Bad Drawings hosted by Ben.

My favourite Carnival is number 146 which featured Tom Rocks Maths for the first time!

Killer robots a step too far say AI researchers

War has always happened throughout human history and, chances are, it will continue to do so in the future. With this in mind, it’s important to ensure that if it does occur it’s carried out as humanely as possible, which is why treaties such as the Geneva Convention exists. Violating certain parts of this treaty, such as the use of chemical and biological weapons, for example, constitutes a war crime. With recent developments in artificial intelligence, a new version of the convention may be required. There have been two major revolutions in warfare so far: gunpowder and nuclear weapons, and the use of artificial intelligence is seen by many as the third such revolution. In an open letter to the United Nations, more than 100 leading robotics experts, including Elon Musk, Stephen Hawking, and the founder of Google’s Deepmind have called for a ban on the use of AI in managing weapons systems. I spoke to Peter Clark, founder of Resurgo Genetics and an expert in machine learning…

  • The letter aims to trigger a debate about having international legislation for AI weapons systems, much in the same way that we have for nuclear or chemical weapons.
  • Current drones require a pilot (even if thousands of miles away) and therefore still maintain an element of human morals and ethics, which means they are very different to a fully autonomous weapons system.
  • One possible example of this technology could be a swarm of mini drones carrying small packets of explosives that could target individuals in a population.
  • Techniques that are currently used to profile people’s online behaviour could be easily applied to such weapons systems to identify and eliminate people that opposed a particular ideology.
  • The technologies being discussed are all available, and could be put together now into a system that could be catastrophic for the globe, which is why this letter is so important.

You can listen to the full interview for the Naked Scientists here.

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