Carnival of Mathematics

Next month (March 2019) I will be hosting the ‘Carnival of Mathematics’ – a monthly blogging round up hosted by a different blog each month and organised by the Aperiodical.

The Carnival of Mathematics accepts any mathematics-related blog posts, YouTube videos or other online content posted during the previous month (February 2019): explanations of serious mathematics, puzzles, writing about mathematics education, mathematical anecdotes, refutations of bad mathematics, applications, reviews, etc. Sufficiently mathematized portions of other disciplines are also acceptable. Links to the previous monthly posts and a FAQ section can be found on the Aperiodical website here.

The deadline to submit your posts will be the 1st March 2019.

Click here to submit an idea!

This incarnation will be the 167th Carnival of Mathematics so here are some fun facts about the number 167…

  • 167 is the only prime number that cannot be expressed as the sum of 7 or fewer cube numbers.
  • 167 is the number of tennis titles won by Martina Navratilova – an all-time record for men or women.
  • 167P/CINEOS is a periodic comet in our solar system.
  • M167 Vulcan is a towed short-range air defence gun.
  • 167 is the London bus route from Ilford to Loughton.

The previous Carnival can be found at Math with Bad Drawings hosted by Ben.

My favourite Carnival is number 146 which featured Tom Rocks Maths for the first time!

Wimbledon Tennis

Grab your rackets, your strawberries and cream and – as long as you’re old enough – a glass of Pimms; because here are the most important facts and figures from Wimbledon…

  • Rackets used to be made from wood but now carbon fibre is the material of choice
  • Top spin pushes the ball down towards the ground via the Magnus force, created by a difference in air pressure around a spinning ball
  • The balls are filled with Nitrogen gas at a pressure higher than the air outside, which causes the gas to leak out over time and is why the balls are replaced often
  • The winner of the coin toss decides if they want to serve first and statistics show that a coin has a 51% chance of landing on the side that was facing down at the start
  • 320,000 glasses of Pimms, 28,000 kilograms of strawberries and 10,000 litres of cream are sold over the fortnight – cheers!

You can listen to the full interview for the Naked Scientists here.

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