JFM China Symposia: Hangzhou

I’m in China this week documenting the JFM Symposia ‘from fundamentals to applied fluid mechanics’ in the three cities of Shenzhen, Hangzhou and Beijing. Check out the CUP website for daily blog entries as well as some of my favourite video highlights from the scientific talks in Hangzhou below.

Detlef Lohse describes how a good scientist must be patient like a good bird-watcher as demonstrated by his experiments with exploding ice droplets

Hang Ding discusses falling droplets and shows a video of one hitting a mosquito

Quan Zhou presents some amazing visuals of Rayleigh-Taylor turbulence 

JFM China Symposia: Shenzhen

I’m in China this week documenting the JFM Symposia ‘from fundamentals to applied fluid mechanics’ in the three cities of Shenzhen, Hangzhou and Beijing. I’ll be writing daily blog entries on the CUP website as well as posting some of my favourite video highlights from the scientific talks, starting with the first symposium in Shenzhen.

Detlef Lohse explains the evaporation of a drop of Ouzo (a traditional Greek alcohol)

Colm Caulfield describes the two types of mixing present in the ocean (including a fantastic visualisation of KH instability)

Anderson Shum demonstrates how a fluid can behave as a ‘dancing ribbon’

Getting tattooed for science…

Listen to me being tattooed whilst attempting to describe the process, and hear from my artist Nat on his experience as a tattooist…. all in the name of science.

You can also watch a short video below of the tattoo being done from the perspective of the artist.

Audio edited by Joe Double.

Funbers 8

The number of legs on a spider, tentacles on an octopus and planets in our solar system… Eight is also a big deal in Asia – listen below to find out why!

You can listen to all of the Funbers episodes from BBC Radio Cambridgeshire here.

Funbers 7

From the number of seas sailed by pirates, to the number of days in the week named after ancient Gods, seven is a popular number. It also happens to be the maximum number of circular items that can be bundled together securely. Now there’s something you don’t hear every day…

You can listen to all of the Funbers episodes from the series with BBC Radio Cambridgeshire here.

Conservation in Botanic Gardens

When we hear the words ‘extinction’ and ‘endangered species’ we often think of animals, but in fact plants are just as threatened. A new study from the University of Cambridge has crunched the numbers and found that 41% of the world’s plants are preserved in botanic gardens with over 300 threatened species found in Cambridge alone. Curator Sam Brockington gave me a guided tour for BBC Radio Cambridgeshire…

 

Making Waves

Waves are ubiquitous in the marine world, but how do we study them and why do they matter? I went along to the lab at Cambridge University’s Maths department to meet researcher Megan Davies Wykes…

 

  • Waves are created in a tank in the lab by moving a paddle backwards and forwards
  • There are two types: deep water waves and shallow water waves – the type is determined by how large the wave is compared to the depth of the water
  • Changing the speed of motion of the paddle does not alter the wave speed as it is determined entirely by the wavelength, which is set by the distance the paddle is moved
  • Internal waves in the ocean are very important for mixing which in turn helps us to understand how things such as climate change will affect the ocean

You can listen to the full interview for the Naked Scientists here.

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